Samegrelo

Description

Samegrelo is a historical region in western Georgia bordering with defacto Abkhazia, Svaneti, Imereti Guria, and the Black Sea. Administratively, it is incorporated with its neighboring mountainous region of Svaneti to form Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti region with an administrative center Zugdidi in Samegrelo. Due to its geographical location, the climate here is subtropical due to the Black Sea coast with frequent rains. Marshlands are common to the coastline and contain various rare birds and animals authentic to the area. Because of this, Georgian law protects a large part of the region's territory and is part of Kolkheti Nature Reserve. Historically, Samegrelo was part of Colchis Kingdom in 9th-6th centuries BC and its successor Egrisi from the 4th century BC to 6th century AD. During the Middle Ages, the region was part of United Kingdom of Georgia, while from the 16th century to the mid-1800s, it was an independent Principality of Megrelia under the rule of Dadiani Royal Family. Later on, it became part of the Democratic Republic of Georgia (1918-21) and part of Soviet Union afterward. The region is known for its beautiful nature, mineral springs, historical sites, and caves, to name a few. Here, you can find house-museum of Dadiani Family in Zugdidi; breathtaking transparent cluster of lakes under a unified name - Tobavarshkhili; Nokalakevi, an ancient town of Egrisi; Enguri dam, a hydroelectric dam which is the world's second-highest concrete arch dam (271.5 meters high), and emerald-green Martvili canyon to name just a few.

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Hiking

Hiking belongs to adventure tourism where a traveler doesn’t use any transport and walks to a specific destination while bringing a tent, food, and other necessary equipment in the backpack. Usually, such supplies are always lightweight and compact to... More

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Canyoning

Another type of adventure tourism, canyoning, is just developing in Georgia. As the name already suggests, canyoning means traveling through canyons and combines rock climbing, swimming, and jumping with ropes, carabiners, and other specific equipment.... More

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Horseback Riding

Since ancient times, Georgians have been involved in horse-breeding. Almost every family had at least one horse. Those families who owned big harras were wealthy shepherds. Georgians used horses as a means of transport, to carry bulky goods, and for horsemanship.... More

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Rafting

White water rafting involves navigating on a mountain river with an inflatable boat. It became popular in Georgia in the 60-70s of the 20th century. It's a fun and extreme activity as you have to overcome the river’s rapid flows, whirlpools, and many... More

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